SHARE

Authorities in Cincinnati have started taking down products made with CBD from stores across the state. CBD or Cannabidiol is one of the active compounds found in the hemp plant. CBD is not psychoactive and has been proven to have health benefits. CBD is different from THC or Tetrahydrocannabinol, the active compound responsible for the psychoactive effects of the marijuana plant.

The Ohio Department of Agriculture is removing CBD products from stores across the states operating as medical marijuana shops. State authorities insist that only approved dispensaries have the right to sell products containing CBD. Many shop owners say CBD products are entirely different from marijuana and should not be taken down.

However, according to the Ohio Board of Pharmacy, only licensed dispensaries should be allowed to sell CBD products. Officials insist that this is based on the new Ohio medical marijuana program.

Many think that CBD products hold many health benefits and should not be restricted from those who need it. Others have also called for the laws regarding medical marijuana and CBD to be changed and reworded.

Antonio Young, director of environmental health with Cincinnati’s health department, said officials were following the laws established by the Ohio Department of Agriculture. He added that for things to change the Ohio Board of Pharmacy would have to get involved.

The CBD products that have been removed from the stores are currently embargoed according to Local 12 reports. Health officials have given shop owners some days to destroy these products. There will be checks to determine if these removed products have been destroyed.

“The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) has identified retail food facilities throughout the state that may potentially be selling food containing Cannabidiol (CBD) products. CBD oil is derived from the cannabis plant. has become the new product in states that have legalized medical marijuana. Food and beverage products containing CBD were introduced in the United States in 2017. Similar to energy drinks and protein bars which may contain vitamin or herbal additives, food, and beverage items can be infused with CBD as an alternative means of ingesting the substance. These products may only be legally sold by a licensed dispenser,” a statement by the Cincinnati Health Department said. “On 1/31/2019, the Cincinnati Health Department’s Food Inspection office received a phone call from ODA stating that establishments within our health jurisdiction may be affected. Local health departments were instructed by ODA to visit the City of Cincinnati locations and embargo the products. Embargoing involves identifying potentially harmful food products, having the products removed from retail sale; itemized/inventoried and photographed on-site.”

“The Cincinnati Health Department inspected all of the identified establishments. Only one establishment required an embargo. The remaining locations has either already removed the products from the shelves or altogether discontinued products for retail sale prior to the inspector’s visit. It is important to note that due to our jurisdictional authority and familiarly of these facilities, local health departments are acting as an extension of the ODA only. The issue will ultimately need to be handled at the distribution points by medical marijuana regulating entities such as the Ohio Board of Pharmacy,” the statement concluded.